This scorecard tracks the city-wide results and indicators for Baltimore City.

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Why Is This Important?

In 2009, Baltimore City had one of the nation's highest infant mortality rates.[1] While improvements have been made since the launch of B’more for Healthy Babies, infant mortality continues to be a public health crisis in Baltimore City and an area of racial disparity. In 2014, Baltimore City had an infant mortality rate of 10.4 deaths per 1,000 live births, among the highest rates in Maryland. While the racial disparity between white and black infant deaths has decreased since 2009, the rate among black infants in 2014 was still significantly higher than that of white infants (12.8 per 1,000 vs. 7.1 per 1,000).[2]



[1] Bringing Up Baltimore, The Pew Charitable Trusts

[2] Maryland Vital Statistics, Infant Mortality in Maryland, 2014

Story Behind the Curve
Strategies to improve these indicators
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Completing high school is essential to finding and keeping family-sustaining employment. In 2014, adults 25 years and older who did not have a high school diploma, had an unemployment rate of 9%, almost twice that of the national average (5%). Those without high school diplomas who do hold jobs as full-time salaried employees, earn just $488 weekly on average, which is significantly lower than the national median of $839 weekly.[1]



[1] U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014 Earnings and Unemployment Rates by Educational Attainment, updated April 2, 2015.

Story Behind the Curve
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Data Discussion
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Story Behind the Curve
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School success remains a top priority for the Mayor’s Office and Baltimore community members. In 2013, the Maryland School Assessment demonstrated that 84.9% of students’ grades 3-8 scored at or above proficient in reading and only 78.2% scored at or above proficient for math.[1] Additionally, chronic absence remains a problem in Baltimore City schools and research shows that reversing chronic absenteeism will increase the probability of graduating for struggling students.[2]



[1] Maryland State Department of Education, Maryland School Assessment Statistics

[2] Predicting High School Outcomes In Baltimore City Schools, BERC

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Many low-income families in Baltimore City struggle with stability, due to a lack of access to services and resources needed to meet basic needs, particularly in areas of nutrition and mental health. Childhood hunger is prevalent; the U.S. food insecurity rate for household with children is 21% with 10.7% of food insecure household with child reporting reduced quantity and quality of food for their children. In Baltimore City, 13.5% of all households report food insecurity and a Baltimore City Health Department survey conducted in 2009 found that 23% of all respondents reported being concerned about not having enough food in the past 30 days.[1] Additionally, 36.5% of children in Baltimore City live below the poverty line and during the 2014-15 school year 84% of children in Baltimore City were eligible for the Free and Reduced Price Meal Programs.[2] After the passage of recent Community Eligibility Provision legislation, the district has been able to qualify all students as being in need of free meals, and as such 100% of Baltimore City Public School students are now considered eligible.


[1] Baltimore City Health Department, Presentation on Food Insecurity

[2] Maryland Poverty Profiles, 2016, Maryland Alliance for the Poor

Story Behind the Curve
Strategies to improve these indicators
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